Dec 042012
 

Credit to Apacheclips.com for the above photo. Interesting to see the Red Star on the fuselage. The pilot was still inside. On his remains were found the Glory Order III Degree and Military Red Banner Order medals.

The above picture and the excerpt below are from :

http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/sheppard/p39/index.htm

This amazing Bell P39 was located at the bottom of Lake Mart-Yavr within the Russian Arctic Circle in the summer of 2004. As with other recoveries over the years, it was discovered by a fisherman who saw the silt covered outline through the crystal clear water.

The P39 sat on the bottom of a shallow lake at a depth of 5m, covered and buried up to the top of the propeller spinner in fine silt. Covered in silt, no markings were initially visible but after a little brushing, a red star appeared together with a yellow serial on the fin and rudder. With the serial now known, a search through the archives showed the pilot had disappeared on a transfer flight in November 1944.

Taking advantage of the good weather, the recovery team used air bags, tripod frames and a truck winch to bring the P39 to the shore. It caused concern that when the P39 emerged both the cockpit doors were still closed. Usually, if it was a water landing, one or both would have been jettisoned allowing for a quick exit. If the lake had been frozen, the team would still have expected one door to be open following any force landing.

The reason soon became apparent; for some unknown reason, the pilot had not exited the P39 and his remains were located in the cockpit. Missing for 60 years, the pilot was buried on 6 October 2004 with full military honours at the Glory Valley Memorial, near the Litza Valley, NW of Murmansk.

BE SURE TO GO TO THIS SAME LINK. THERE ARE A WHOLE SERIES OF PHOTOS PLUS THE HISTORY OF THIS SPECIFIC PLANE AND ITS PILOT.

http://lend-lease.airforce.ru/english/articles/sheppard/p39/index.htm


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Dec 042012
 

C-130 Hercules

“That airplane stopped right opposite the captain’s bridge,” recalled Flock. “There was cheering and laughing. There on the side of the fuselage, a big sign had been painted on that said, “LOOK MA, NO HOOK.”

Altogether, the crew successfully negotiated 29 touch-and-go landings, 21 unarrested full-stop landings, and 21 unassisted takeoffs at gross weights of 85,000 pounds up to 121,000 pounds. At 85,000 pounds, the KC-130F came to a complete stop within 267 feet, about twice the aircraft’s wing span! The Navy was delighted to discover that even with a maximum payload, the plane used only 745 feet for takeoff and 460 feet for landing roll.

(Thanks to Deryl Moses for this forwarding.)

Rear Admiral James H. Flatley, III (Ret).

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